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  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coochin View Post
    I have no intention of connecting that Win10 installation to the Internet to avoid any possibility of M$ detecting the different install (I did it as a test only).
    What's the value of that static installation of Windows 10? You've already missed several service rollup updates containing numerous bug and security fixes.

    Is that copy activated?


    Quote Originally Posted by Coochin View Post
    My experience has been that I have several hundred times fitted new motherboards or other affected hardware to customers' computers, or moved their existing Windows to a new hardware setup, after which I have invariably had to re-activate Windows on the new setup; but in all cases re-activation has succeeded.
    But things have changed with how Microsoft is handling product keys and hardware IDs for activation.

    It is my contention that ALL upgrades to Windows 10 from 7/8 or Insider Preview now have these generic keys:

    Windows 10 Home - YTMG3-N6DKC-DKB77-7M9GH-8HVX7
    Windows 10 Pro - VK7JG-NPHTM-C97JM-9MPGT-3V66T
    Windows 10 Home Single Language - 7HNRX-D7KGG-3K4RQ-4WPJ4-YTDFH
    Windows 10 Enterprise - NPPR9-FWDCX-D2C8J-H872K-2YT43

    There may be some additional edition variances, but I don't think any of us have unique Windows 10 product keys.


    Quote Originally Posted by jwitalka View Post
    And according to the ZDnet article referenced by LarryNY, you could also have left the Product Key field blank and hit the skip link and you would still have wound up with an activated install.
    ... if connected to internet? ... which he didn't?

  2. #17
    WS Lounge VIP Coochin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jwitalka View Post
    And according to the ZDnet article referenced by LarryNY, you could also have left the Product Key field blank and hit the skip link and you would still have wound up with an activated install...
    There was no "skip link", and no way to continue without entering a product key.
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  3. #18
    WS Lounge VIP Coochin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BruceR View Post
    What's the value of that static installation of Windows 10?...
    As I stated in my #14 post "... I installed to a spare, blank HDD specifically to test whether setup would accept the extracted product key; and setup did accept the extracted product key".

    Quote Originally Posted by BruceR View Post
    ...Is that copy activated?...
    No. Again, I was interested to see what would happen when installing from DVD without any active Internet connection or any other OS present.

    Quote Originally Posted by BruceR View Post
    ...Windows 10 Pro - VK7JG-NPHTM-C97JM-9MPGT-3V66T...
    That matches the key I extracted with ProduKey as in my #1 post, which would appear to support your contention.

    Also, it does not match the key being used up to, and including, build 10162.
    Computer Consultant/Technician since 1998 (first PC was Atari 1040STE in 1988).
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  4. #19
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    I'm sorry, Coochin. I didn't mean for everyone to beat up on you. I was thinking of posting the two news articles about the new Windows 10 activation process in a new post, but I found your earlier post, this one, which also talked about Windows 10 product keys.

    It was clear to me from the beginning as you said this was an experiment to see what would happen. I found your posts interesting and informative - a valuable lesson on how the DVD install works.

    Your comment about not being able to skip the product key screen during install on the test hard drive makes sense, because you were not connected to the internet then. As Jerry said in post #15:

    And according to the ZDnet article referenced by LarryNY, you could also have left the Product Key field blank and hit the skip link and you would still have wound up with an activated install.
    That is true WHEN you are connected to the internet. The Win10 install checks the MS servers to identify your PC's previous license/TP user status before you reach the product key screen. Since it was unable to communicate with the servers, it refused to allow you to skip the PK screen.

    I guess you didn't read the PCWorld article I referenced which said in the second paragraph:

    "In Windows 10, utilities like Magical Jelly Bean KeyFinder or Belarc Advisor return generic product keys instead of authentic ones. Donít believe me? This is the key Windows 10 Pro users will see in KeyFinder or Belarc Advisor: VK7JG-NPHTM-C97JM-9MPGT-3V66T."
    I wondered whether this was your key or maybe MS issued TP users another generic key number. At least you have now also confirmed for us that your TP upgrade yielded the same generic product key number that all Win 7/8.1 Pro upgraders will see.

    Originally Posted by LarryNY
    ...but I suspect that you won't be able to use it on another PC...
    Can you provide any independent references for that?

    My experience has been that I have several hundred times fitted new motherboards or other affected hardware to customers' computers, or moved their existing Windows to a new hardware setup, after which I have invariably had to re-activate Windows on the new setup; but in all cases re-activation has succeeded.
    Yes, and so have I. But each time I used a valid MS Product Key when I re-activated. I based my guess on the two articles I referenced which explain how it works.

    The new thing about the Win 10 activation process is that MS is now assigning a unique ID to each PC that installs Win 10 and storing the ID number on their servers. So, you could place the second hard drive in your PC and it would be fine as a replacement hard drive, because your PC's Win10 license is valid. The PCWorld reporter says he did exactly that on his laptop with an SSD, too.

    But, based on what the ZDNet and PCWorld articles state, I guessed if you place the second hard drive in a different PC which has not yet been upgraded to Win10 (and so has no Win10 hardware ID on file) that MS would de-activate the install in time when it cross-checked their servers -- in a few hours, a few days or a few weeks, I don't know. That would make another interesting experiment for someone else to try and report the results. [And afterwards, they could reinstall their Win7/8.1 and still get their Win10 upgrade with no harm done.]

    As both the ZDNet and PCWorld articles conclude, this new Entitlement model raises some new implications. The other thing I would really like to know is how Microsoft is going to handle motherboard replacements in the future for all the Free Windows 10 upgraders. Are MS support reps going to ask customers for the Win 7/8.1 product key that they threw away years ago? Are they going to ask for a store receipt for the PC they bought ten years prior? How will they be able to identify someone as having a valid Win10 license when their hardware has been fried and the unique ID, which no one knows now anyway, is lost?

    I look forward to your future post in five years time.

  5. #20
    WS Lounge VIP Coochin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LarryNY View Post
    I'm sorry, Coochin. I didn't mean for everyone to beat up on you...


    It's alright mate, I'm an Aussie and we can take it!

    Quote Originally Posted by LarryNY View Post
    ...That would make another interesting experiment for someone else to try and report the results. [And afterwards, they could reinstall their Win7/8.1 and still get their Win10 upgrade with no harm done.]

    As both the ZDNet and PCWorld articles conclude, this new Entitlement model raises some new implications. The other thing I would really like to know is how Microsoft is going to handle motherboard replacements in the future for all the Free Windows 10 upgraders. Are MS support reps going to ask customers for the Win 7/8.1 product key that they threw away years ago? Are they going to ask for a store receipt for the PC they bought ten years prior? How will they be able to identify someone as having a valid Win10 license when their hardware has been fried and the unique ID, which no one knows now anyway, is lost?

    I look forward to your future post in five years time.

    I've seen quite a few opinions expressed about how M$ has/will change their handling of product keys & hardwareIDs but I haven't yet seen any clear statement from M$ on the subject (which should not be any surprise).

    Have also seen quite a few posters saying they imaged or cloned their Win7/Win8 systems before upgrading to Win10 in the expectation they would be able to go back to their previous OS. That might work for a time, but might stop working after after a month-or-three if M$ clamps down.

    I did consider experimenting with upgrading one of my Win7 systems, but decided it is too soon yet to risk ending up with invalidated product keys. Maybe in two or three months time if Win10 is looking well-sorted then.
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  6. #21
    Gold Lounger wavy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LarryNY View Post
    Coochin,
    .
    http://www.zdnet.com/article/microso...or-windows-10/
    But what about those who did a clean install of a preview edition, never upgrading over a licensed copy?

    Sorry. You can skip the product key during installation, but when you're done with Setup your system will be marked as not activated. You won't be able to use any personalization options, and you'll have a persistent watermark on the desktop warning you that you need to activate.
    We know this is not accurate. It is of course activated!
    Last edited by wavy; 2015-08-15 at 11:34. Reason: link
    David

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  7. #22
    Gold Lounger wavy's Avatar
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    Hardware ID

    It is an interesting question about how WX TP upgraded to Pro installed on a VM will be treated..
    I also wonder how OEM boxes with identical hardware will be treated if injected w/ VLKs.
    David

    Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.

  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by wavy View Post
    The ZDNet article stated:

    "But what about those who did a clean install of a preview edition, never upgrading over a licensed copy?

    Sorry. You can skip the product key during installation, but when you're done with Setup your system will be marked as not activated. You won't be able to use any personalization options, and you'll have a persistent watermark on the desktop warning you that you need to activate."

    We know this is not accurate. It is of course activated!
    wavy, yeah, I noticed that error in the ZDNet article, too.

    Maybe his test Win10 TP machines were not setup in time. I read somewhere that TP users who did not sign up in time to be counted among the 30-day+ users were not going to get a Win10 license.

    Win10 TP users who did sign up more than 30 days before the program ended [like Coochin] did receive a valid license.

    I don't know anyone who signed up in the last weeks of the program, so I don't have any verification of this MS policy.

    Maybe some readers here who signed up late could let us know whether they were able to upgrade to Windows 10 Pro or not.

  9. #24
    Silver Lounger lumpy95's Avatar
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    Have also seen quite a few posters saying they imaged or cloned their Win7/Win8 systems before upgrading to Win10 in the expectation they would be able to go back to their previous OS. That might work for a time, but might stop working after after a month-or-three if M$ clamps down.
    Now THAT would upset me since that was my backup plan. I assume that MS could just invalidate the previous win 7 key but since it was paid for with cash, they may have a problem on their hands.

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